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‘More than a job’: New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center reopens Thursday with new exhibit

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SouthCoast Today | The Standard-Times

Anastasia Lennon

April 14, 2021

NEW BEDFORD — Just a few minutes from the city’s waterfront sits a collection of films, photos, audio recordings and artifacts that tell the story of an industry not often seen firsthand by the general public: the fishing industry. 

After closing in December, the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center reopens this Thursday with its new exhibit, “More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry.” The center describes it as an “introduction” to New Bedford’s preeminent industry. 

“The nation’s most valuable port has long deserved an institution dedicated to telling its story,” said Laura Orleans, executive director of the center. “The Fishing Heritage Center fills that void.”

New Bedford fishing industry

The exhibit explores the industry in New Bedford beginning in the 1900s by considering sustainability, labor unions, diversity, family, community and the “American dream.” It illustrates what the industry does and represents through the voices and stories of those in it, Orleans said. 

Sal Sequeira, Dave St. Pierre and Domingo Ixcuna Lucas of Blue Fleet Welding Services, install a one-third scale scallop dredge they manufactured, inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.  This is one of the many new exhibits soon to open.
Sal Sequeira, Dave St. Pierre and Domingo Ixcuna Lucas of Blue Fleet Welding Services, install a one-third scale scallop dredge they manufactured, inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center. This is one of the many new exhibits soon to open. Peter Pereira/ New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

“To be standing all day makes you tired. But sometimes when you are working, cleaning fish, you start thinking of your father or sometimes your mother and you think ‘I’ll send my check this week,'” said Lillian Riveira, a fish cutter, in one of the recordings that will play in the exhibit. 

Orleans estimates they have 300 to 400 hours of audio recordings, which they plan to swap periodically in the exhibit so that visitors can hear new material. 

Aurally, visitors will also get to experience the sound of the fog horn, a mayday call, or a vessel’s engine, which ticks interminably for those on board for long stretches.

Visually, visitors can view model vessels and various artifacts fishermen have pulled up in their nets, including a mastodon tooth and a Russian belt buckle. They can also view decades-old footage spliced with present-day film, which in combination show what has and has not changed in the industry.  

Laura Orleans, director, tests out one of the many new audio content stations being installed inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford's Commercial Fishing Industry.  The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
Laura Orleans, director, tests out one of the many new audio content stations being installed inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon. Peter Pereira/ New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

One of Orleans’ favorite parts of the exhibit is a tall board with dozens of nicknames belonging to ship crew from Fairhaven and New Bedford, some of which have previously been displayed at the center. While some nicknames are funny, a few are ethnic slurs, Orleans noted.

“I think it’s going to be an interesting thing for people to talk about,” she said, adding that some aspects of the exhibit deal with some less celebratory, more contentious subjects, including the offshore wind industry and labor unions. 

Sustaining the ocean’s resources

The executive director hopes people walk away from the exhibit with an understanding that for many people in the fishing industry, their job is their way of life. She also wants people to recognize that fishermen have been working “since the beginning” to sustain the ocean’s resources

Matt Walsh and Stephen Walsh of WB Inc. carpenters, are seen through one of the windows on the bridge found inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford's Commercial Fishing Industry.  The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
Matt Walsh and Stephen Walsh of WB Inc. carpenters, are seen through one of the windows on the bridge found inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon. Peter Pereira/ New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

“I feel like people come in often with a preconception that fishermen… don’t care about the environment,” she said. “Part of what we’re trying to do is put a human face on the fishing community and give people a sense that fishermen really depend on a healthy resource in order to fish.”

Thursday marks the “soft opening” before the exhibit’s official opening celebration in June, which will also mark the center’s five-year anniversary. Admission is free until July 1, when the center will start charging a fee of $5 or less, depending on age and membership status. 

“I hope people will take some time when they’re here to pick up those handsets and listen to the voices of the fishing community because I think that people have amazing stories to share,” Orleans said. “Some of them are really funny, some are very poignant, and what I really like is that people get an opportunity to hear directly from people who live this every day.”

The new exhibit was funded by a National Endowment for the Humanities grant and Bristol County Savings Bank. Fairhaven Shipyard and Blue Fleet Welding donated time and resources, including building the exhibit’s working deck.

The center is open between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Thursday through Sunday. For more information, visit www.fishingheritagecenter.org

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center to open with new exhibits

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SouthCoast Today | The Standard-Times

April 14, 2021

Sal Sequeira, Dave St. Pierre and Domingo Ixcuna Lucas of Blue Fleet Welding Services, install a one-third scale scallop dredge they manufactured, inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center. This is one of the many new exhibits soon to open.
Sal Sequeira, Dave St. Pierre and Domingo Ixcuna Lucas of Blue Fleet Welding Services, install a one-third scale scallop dredge they manufactured, inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center. This is one of the many new exhibits soon to open.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
(l to r) Mauro Moreira, Matt Walsh, and Stephen Walsh, install a display with New Bedford fishermen nicknames. WB Inc. carpenters install new exhibits inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford's Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
(l to r) Mauro Moreira, Matt Walsh, and Stephen Walsh, install a display with New Bedford fishermen nicknames. WB Inc. carpenters install new exhibits inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Laura Orleans, director, tests out one of the many new audio content stations being installed inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford's Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
Laura Orleans, director, tests out one of the many new audio content stations being installed inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Matt Walsh and Stephen Walsh of WB Inc. carpenters, are seen through one of the windows on the bridge found inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford's Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
Matt Walsh and Stephen Walsh of WB Inc. carpenters, are seen through one of the windows on the bridge found inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Laura Orleans, director, looks on, as a new one-third scale scallop dredge manufactured by Blue Fleet Welding Services is installed at the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
Laura Orleans, director, looks on, as a new one-third scale scallop dredge manufactured by Blue Fleet Welding Services is installed at the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Matt Walsh carries an informational sign outlining the type of fish caught by New Bedford fishermen. WB Inc. carpenters install new exhibits inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford's Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
Matt Walsh carries an informational sign outlining the type of fish caught by New Bedford fishermen. WB Inc. carpenters install new exhibits inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Laura Orleans, director, and Charlie York, look on below, as Sal Sequeira and Dave St Pierre, hang the one-third scale scallop dredge from the ceiling of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
Laura Orleans, director, and Charlie York, look on below, as Sal Sequeira and Dave St Pierre, hang the one-third scale scallop dredge from the ceiling of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Matt Walsh and Mauro Moreira, of WB Inc. install an informational panel outlining the type of fish New Bedford fishermen catch. This one of the many new exhibits being installed inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford's Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
Matt Walsh and Mauro Moreira, of WB Inc. install an informational panel outlining the type of fish New Bedford fishermen catch. This one of the many new exhibits being installed inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Stephen Walsh walks past the ships bell, as he makes modifications to the wheelhouse and ships bunks being installed, as part of the all new exhibits at the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
Stephen Walsh walks past the ships bell, as he makes modifications to the wheelhouse and ships bunks being installed, as part of the all new exhibits at the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Blue Fleet Welding Services welders, Domingo Ixcuna Lucas, Sal Sequeira and Dave St Pierre, install the one-third scallop dredge they manufactured for the newly redone interior of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
Blue Fleet Welding Services welders, Domingo Ixcuna Lucas, Sal Sequeira and Dave St Pierre, install the one-third scallop dredge they manufactured for the newly redone interior of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Stephen Walsh and Laura Orleans, director, discuss where the new exhibits will be placed inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford's Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
Stephen Walsh and Laura Orleans, director, discuss where the new exhibits will be placed inside of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center on Bethel Street in New Bedford, which is undergoing major renovations including More than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry. The new exhibits are scheduled to open soon.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES
Blue Fleet Welding Services welders, Domingo Ixcuna Lucas, Sal Sequeira and Dave St Pierre, install the one-third scallop dredge they manufactured for the newly redone interior of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
Blue Fleet Welding Services welders, Domingo Ixcuna Lucas, Sal Sequeira and Dave St Pierre, install the one-third scallop dredge they manufactured for the newly redone interior of the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.
PETER PEREIRA/THE STANDARD-TIMES

A New Exhibit about New Bedford Fishing [Townsquare Sunday]

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1420 WBSM

Jim Phillips (April 9, 2021)

Restrictions are slowly being lifted and more COVID-19 vaccine is becoming available, and the people running the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center are hopeful they’ll be welcoming more visitors this spring and summer to their 38 Bethel Street location.

When those visitors arrive, they can enjoy a new exhibit about New Bedford and its fishing industry.

The Center’s Executive Director, Laura Orleans joins Townsquare Sunday to discuss the new exhibit, entitled “More Than A Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry.”

The exhibit attempts to explain the culture of New Bedford and its connection to one of the world’s most dangerous professions.

A “soft” opening will take place this month, with a grand opening set for June 25-26.

Laura is also recruiting a new round of volunteers for the Fishing Heritage Center. She explains what those jobs entail. Her interview can be heard here:

Townsquare Sunday is a weekly public affairs program that airs every Sunday morning at 6 on 1429 WBSM.  The program highlights individuals and organizations working to make Greater New Bedford a better place to live, work and play.

If you would like your organization featured on Townsquare Sunday, please e-mail the host at jim.phillips@townsquaremedia.com.

Read More: A New Exhibit About New Bedford and Fishing [TOWNSQUARE SUNDAY] | https://wbsm.com/a-new-exhibit-about-new-bedford-and-fishing-townsquare-sunday/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

Heritage center to highlight women’s roles in commercial fishing industry with programs, exhibit

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SouthCoast Today | The Standard-Times

Anastasia Lennon (March 9, 2021)

NEW BEDFORD — Years before the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center was established, the city’s annual two-day Working Waterfront Festival in 2007 focused on women and their role in the commercial fishing industry. 

Laura Orleans, executive director of the center who was involved in the festival planning, said a man on the planning committee had asked if the festival would be all about fishermen’s wives, as that was what he thought about women in the industry.

Women who are married to fishermen serve an important role, but they have many other roles, Orleans said. They own and captain boats, process fish, study fisheries as scientists, make fishing gear, do the bookkeeping, serve as observers for fisheries management and act as some of the strongest advocates for the industry. 

This reality will be the focus of the center’s new project, “Women’s Work: At Sea, On Shore, At Home, In the Community.” Programming starts this month and will culminate in a new exhibit on women scheduled to open late this summer. 

Mary Stanley, known as "Fish Mary," with a bag of scallops on her head in the 1960s. She worked as a "lumper," meaning she offloaded fish from the vessels.
Mary Stanley, known as “Fish Mary,” with a bag of scallops on her head in the 1960s. She worked as a “lumper,” meaning she offloaded fish from the vessels. Jim Dwyer through The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

Women tend to be “invisible” in this industry, Orleans said. “Fishing happens out of sight, offshore or in these mysterious processing places… What we try to do with the programs and exhibits is shine a light and humanize the often mysterious, unknown industry… People just don’t have any sense of ways in which women are involved.”

The executive director said compared to other ports, especially out west in California and Alaska, the Port of New Bedford has fewer women on boats and going out to sea. 

When asked if she would like to see more women in the local fleets, Orleans said she wants anyone, regardless of gender, to get a job on a boat if they have the skills and commitment. 

Orleans said pre-pandemic, the center would have school groups visit, which is one of the reasons they are creating the new exhibit on women.

Sarah Fortin working on nets at Reidar's Trawl-Scallop Gear and Marine Supply.
Sarah Fortin working on nets at Reidar’s Trawl-Scallop Gear and Marine Supply. New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

“I have been painfully aware of the fact that you see images of men,” Orleans said. “I always have wanted the high school kids, especially high school girls, to see themselves on the walls and in the center… to not just take my word for it.” 

The exhibit, which is still in its early stages of planning, will look at women in each part of the industry, she said. The center will also focus on Mary Stanley, a woman better known as “Fish Mary,” who was the only local woman offloading heavy bags of fish from boats in the 1950s and 1960s. 

Before the exhibit opens, the center will offer many opportunities to learn more about women’s roles in the fishing industry.

This March, during Women’s History Month, the center is offering two programs. On March 11 at 7 p.m., attendees will explore women and the sea through a virtual concert and lecture on Facebook. Then, on March 19 at 7 p.m., the center will stream a documentary through Zoom on women in the fishing industry at Point Judith, Rhode Island. 

Orleans said she and other staff are excited about partnering with local schools and the YWCA to bring awareness to young women in the community about the ways in which women have been involved.

“In particular, for women to see themselves in strong roles,” Orleans said. 

The center is receiving funding for the new programs and exhibit from the National Endowment for the Arts, Women’s Fisheries Network, Massachusetts Cultural Council and the cultural councils of Dartmouth, Mattapoisett, New Bedford and Westport.

For more information about upcoming programs and exhibits, visit fishingheritagecenter.org/programs/calendar/

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center to Highlight Women’s Work

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1420 WBSM

Mary Serreze | February 5, 2021

Women have always played a big role in the world of commercial fishing, and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts will help the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center highlight their work at sea and on shore.

Women’s Work: At Sea, On Shore, At Home, In the Community will use photography, film, music, poetry, and storytelling to highlight the often-untold stories of women in commercial fishing communities.

The $15,000 NEA grant, which requires a local match, is among 1,073 grants awarded to local arts projects across the country, representing nearly $25 million in federal funding.

From March through December 2021 in New Bedford, gallery exhibits and programs will explore the lives, skills, and experiences of women who work in the fishing industry, as well as the work of those who are connected through family.

The fishing heritage center is excited to highlight contributions women make to the industry, “thus dispelling the common misperception that the commercial fishing industry is exclusively a man’s world,” said executive director Laura Orleans.

Orleans said that local businesses are invited to help the center raise matching funds. The center can be reached at info@fishingheritagecenter.org or at (508) 993-8894.

The center will partner with Our Sisters School, Greater New Bedford Vocational Technical High School, Global Learning Charter Public High School, and the YWCA to engage young people in the project.

The center is dedicated to preserving and presenting the story of the commercial fishing industry past, present, and future through exhibits, programs, and archives. It’s located at 38 Bethel Street in downtown New Bedford.

The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center is among select organizations nationwide that have demonstrated “creativity, excellence, and resilience during this very challenging year,” said Arts Endowment Acting Chairman Ann Eilers.

The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center: A Hidden Gem in the South Shore

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Our Wicked Fish

January 18, 2020

THE NEW BEDFORD FISHING HERITAGE CENTER: A HIDDEN GEM IN THE SOUTH SHORE

*Note: Admission to The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center is free from January – March 2020

Street view of the New Bedford Heritage Fishing Center in Downtown New BedfordWhat do you think of when you hear “New Bedford”? For the longest time, I always thought of The Whaling Museum, cobblestone streets, massive portions of delicious Portuguese food, and fleets of scallop boats in the harbor. Do you think of these iconic items too?

 

Now, I hope to add one more piece to your portrait of New Bedford – the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.

This place is a must-visit! Their purpose is to preserve and present the story of the fishing community past, present, and future.

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center is at 38 Bethel Street in Downtown New Bedford

THE SPACE & EXHIBITS

The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center is a small space with a big heart.

Visitors get immersed in what it is like to be part of different seafood industry professions at different periods in time! Their exhibits are interactive, informative, and are created with help from the industry professionals that make New Bedford the most valuable seaport in the United States. The nets, gear, historic documents, photographs, and personnel are the real deal!

Within the Center’s 2,100 square foot main gallery at 38 Bethel Street are several exhibits including Gear Up where “visitors can try mending a section of net and develop a grub list – a shopping list to feed their crew…”. There’s also a visitor and industry favorite called At Sea  which “explores daily life aboard a fishing vessel including all aspects of the work, the use of technology for navigation and communication, and the importance of safety, as well as the experience of cooking, eating, and sleeping at sea. A wheelhouse creates a sense of shipboard life. A dress-up area allows visitors to don fisherman’s clothing.”

Their gift shop itself is a hidden gem in downtown New Bedford.  Unique artisan pieces like handmade jewelry, beautiful fish and marine paintings, and a stellar collection of books makes you second guess whether you’re in a museum or in a high-end gift boutique. And unlike most gift shops, the pieces are affordable and many are made locally by artists from the fishing community.

One of the hands-on activities at the Gear-Up exhibit is learning how to mend a fishing net. Photo at The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center. Taken by A.Davis

SPECIAL EVENTS

The Fishing Heritage Center is more than exhibits too. There’s a flexible public programming space for related talks, film screenings, performances, demonstrations and educational programs. Their calendar of events can be found here and many events are free and open to the public.

Films about the commercial fishing industry and other aspects of the working waterfront are screened on the third Friday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the theater of the New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park’s Corson Maritime Learning Center, located at 33 William Street.

SPECIAL GROUP TOURS OF VESSELS & MORE
nb heritage.jpeg

If interested, tours of the seafood auction, fish processing plants, gear manufacturing facilities, and fishing vessels are available.  In addition, guided walking tours of the port are available. Tour fees vary depending upon tour selected and size of the group.

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT

The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center relies on grants and support from the community. Here are ways you can support them

  • Visit with friends and family – You’ll be so glad you did. Here’s a link to visitor information including hours, directions, and parking.

  • School field trips– The exhibits were designed for all ages to learn about their seafood and the industry.  The staff does a fantastic job organizing logistics with teachers and schools and, with enough notice, can arrange for students to tour a vessel, the auction house, and fish processing plants. Here is their contact information page

  • Attend their special events

  • Donate – You can donate online, in person, or by mail. “ Supporters help us preserve and present the story of the fishing industry past, present, and future, through exhibits, programs, and archives. We thank you on behalf of the children we serve, the community we engage, and the many members and visitors who benefit from your generous gift. “         – New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

  • Eat local seafood – Support New Bedford’s fishing community by eating a diversity of locally caught seafood including scallops, haddock, pollock, hake, and skate!

  • Share their messages – Not only do they make great exhibits inside the center, but they also make fantastic online content! They can be found on Instagram @nbfishingheritagecenter and on Facebook at NBFishingHeritageCenter .

THANK YOU

A big thank you to Laura Orleans, director of New Bedford Heritage Center, for the tour and stories and her time. And a thank you to Brendan Mitchell for connecting me with Laura.

What is the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center?

Read the article online here.

Fun107

Michael Rock (September 22, 2020)

Much the way the Whaling Museum in New Bedford honors and educates about the most lucrative era in the city’s history, there is another organization in New Bedford that does something similar for the fishing industry.

The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center’s aim is to preserve the storied fishing heritage of the SouthCoast.

There are displays that honor the men and women in the industry, along with their families. Due to the long periods of time that the fishing boats would be at sea, it was (and is) a great strain on families. For those that have died at sea, their names are memorialized at places like the Heritage Center and Seamen’s Bethel. For their families, this means quite a bit.

One of those names is Thomas Quintin, Jr. Quintin is presumed to have fallen overboard two years ago while fishing in broad daylight off the coast of Long Island, New York. His daughter Kaylen Quintin told us that fishing was in his blood. It was a job he’d held since he was a teenager. In fact, both of Quintin’s grandfathers were also lost at sea.

“Fishing is dangerous, and he knew that,” she said. “All the men and women who go out there and fish, they know that, too. That’s always a possibility, and it’s scary.”

Kaylen Quintin was sure to mention women, because while they were not in the majority, there are a few women that have played a part on the working waterfront for decades. According to the Fishing Heritage Center, Mary Stanley – known as “Fish Mary” – was a figure on the New Bedford waterfront and the only female lumper in the 1950s and 1960s.

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center via Facebook

“We’re so thankful for places like the Fishing Heritage Center and Seamen’s Bethel. His name is up on the wall there with all of the other people who have lost their lives while fishing at sea,” Quintin said. She said there’s a certain amount of comfort that comes from the memorial.

Normally, the center hosts a Seafood Soirée dining event as its major fundraising event of the year, but the event has been changed up due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The center is instead selling coupon books featuring discounts to a list of local restaurants and seafood markets. There will also be an online auction.

The following businesses will all having coupons in the Soirée book:

  • Acushnet Creamery
  • Bittersweet Farm Restaurant and Tavern
  • The Black Whale
  • Bom Apetite
  • Brothers Artisanal Premium Jerky
  • Cafe Roma
  • Cape Quality Seafood Market
  • Danny’s Seafood Bar & Grille
  • DeMellos Produce Market
  • Destination Soups
  • Dorothy Cox’s Chocolate
  • Gary’s Best
  • Green Bean
  • Kool Kone
  • Kyler’s Catch Seafood Market
  • Little Moss
  • Marion General Store
  • Merrill’s on the Wharf
  • Moby Dick Brewing Co.
  • PLAY Arcade
  • Rochelle’s Restaurant
  • Rockin’ Guac
  • Table 8
  • The Baker
  • The Galley Grille
  • The Little Village Cafe
  • Tia Maria’s
  • Yia Yia’s Pizza Café

Read More: What Is the New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center? | https://fun107.com/what-is-the-new-bedford-fishing-heritage-center/?utm_source=tsmclip&utm_medium=referral

Photographic Memories

View the digital magazine here. The article featuring the Fishing Heritage Center’s Scanning Day program may be viewed on pages 16-17.

South Coast Insider

Photographic Memories

Ron Fortier (August 2019)

AUGUST ALREADY? If you’re as surprised as we are, then it’s true what they say: time really does fly when you’re having fun! This month, let’s enjoy what remains of summer before the days shorten and the nights cool. ON THE COVER: As the long days of summer shorten, sunsets become a greater part of our days. Make the most of the rest of the season by visiting the gorgeous natural locales around the region. See some of our favorites on page 16. Photo by Greg Stone.

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center lands prestigious NEH Grant

Read the article online here.

National Endowment for the Humanities

June 27, 2019

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center has been awarded a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to redevelop the Center’s permanent exhibit.

More Than a Job: Work and Community in New Bedford’s Commercial Fishing Industry will build on the Center’s inaugural exhibit, From Boat to Table, which introduced visitors to all aspects of the fishing industry. The new exhibit will continue to provide the visitor with an introduction to the workings of the fishing industry while also exploring themes of labor history, immigration, and the changing nature of work and community. Digital storytelling will be incorporated throughout to present the lives, skills and experiences of fishermen, shoreside workers, their families, and the larger community. The revamped exhibit is slated to open in Winter of 2021.

The $200,000 grant from NEH provides much of the funding needed to carry out the project.

“We are thrilled and honored to be receiving this grant, which will enable us to produce an exhibit worthy of the fishing industry story,” said Executive Director Laura Orleans. “The exhibit plans are the result of more than one hundred interviews with members of the fishing community as well as input from a team of humanities scholars.”

We Came to Fish, We Came to Work: Stories of Immigration

Read the article online here. It includes links to the digital version of the exhibit.

New Bedford Light

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center

As a nonprofit, nonpartisan community news outlet dedicated to representing the diverse voices and images of our place, The New Bedford Light is pleased to share this remarkable series produced by New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center.


The Port of New Bedford has long drawn immigrants from around the world. Despite differences in language and culture, a highly-valued fishing industry developed, drawing on the strengths of immigrants from all over the world including Cape Verde, Guatemala, Norway, Nova Scotia, Vietnam, and Portugal. This exhibit explores why and how people came to New Bedford and how they became involved in the working waterfront.

The people and stories profiled in this exhibit are a small representation of the many different communities that make up New Bedford’s working waterfront.

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